• Books:

    The Out-of-Sync Child, Carol Stock Kranowitz
    Tools for Tots: Sensory Strategies for Toddlers and Preschoolers, Diana Henry
    The Late Talker: What To Do if Your Child Isn’t Talking Yet, Marilyn Agin MD
    The Best Advice I Ever Got: Tips for Children Birth to Eight, Sally Lee Parents Magazine
    Making Your Children Mind without Losing Yours, Dr. Kevin Leman
    Babies with Down Syndrome, Karen Stray-Gundersen

  • FAQ 1

    Q: If I feel my child has delays or is struggling in a specific area (gross motor, fine–motor, self care, speech and language skills) what should I do?

    A: Contact A Step Ahead Pediatric Therapy to determine if an assessment is warranted. If so, we will schedule an evaluation at a time that is convenient for both you and your child.

  • FAQ 2

    Q: How often will my child need occupational/physical/speech therapy services?

    A: The frequency of service is determined by several factors including the severity of the need, the age and attention span of the child, your personal schedule, and your insurance coverage. Most children receiving services at A Step Ahead Pediatric Therapy attend 1-2 times per week. The length of the session also varies, with most children having 30 or 45 minute sessions. These decisions will be made following the evaluation and will be made by you and your therapist.

  • FAQ 3

    Q: Will my insurance cover these services?

    A: A Step Ahead Pediatric Therapy is providers for numerous insurance companies. Most insurance plans have benefits for outpatient therapies (PT, OT, and Speech) that are based on medical necessity. Regardless of network affiliation, we will work with your insurance company to determine eligibility and level of coverage as well as bill them directly for our services. If there is no insurance coverage we will work with you to arrange payment options.

  • FAQ 4

    Q: How is private occupational or physical therapy different from the therapy provided at my child’s public school?

    A: Occupational and physical therapy provided through the public school system is categorized as related services. This means that in order for a child to receive occupational or physical therapy as a free service through the public school, the child must qualify for special education services. A child cannot receive occupational or physical therapy unless they meet the criteria set up by the state to be eligible for special education. Many students who do not meet these criteria need occupational or physical therapy services. Additionally, students who do qualify for occupational or physical therapy at school might need additional therapy. While school occupational and physical therapists are highly qualified and perform an excellent service, the realities of school based practice often mean the therapist carries a large caseload and the amount of service provided could be minimal.

  • FAQ 5

    Q: How is private speech therapy different from the therapy provided at my child’s public school?

    A: In the state of Kentucky, speech/language impairment is considered a disability area and a child can qualify for speech therapy services at school even if they do not receive any other types of academic special education services. The state has a specific criterion, or test score, that a child must score below in order to qualify for these services. Many students who do not meet this criterion need speech therapy services. Additionally, students who do qualify for speech therapy at school might need additional therapy. While school speech therapists are highly qualified and perform an excellent service, the realities of school based practice often mean the therapist carries a large caseload and the amount of service provided could be minimal.